DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Journal Summary 2 - Second Quarter

 

 ||     (November 4, 2009 – January 11, 2010)     ||    Total logged hours: 41     ||

  

            The second quarter of interning at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory consisted of meeting several other employees, doing research for my project (and for my mentor’s and my curiosity), and getting more and more familiarized with the methods and tools with which I am working for my research project.  I am incredibly familiar with the two major tools that I am using this year, MATLAB and the Global Positioning System (GPS) Data Logging device, and now I also know a little bit about other data logging devices besides mine, about how to use Microsoft Visual Studio, and about how to manipulate data with Excel.  I have done more experiments with the portable GPS Data Logger, lent to me at the first day of my internship, including a round-trip to Harris Teeter – coming back exactly the same way I came.  With this experiment, my mentor and I did the best we could to answer some interesting questions, such as: Are we able to tell which lane I was in?  Can we detect a lane change that I made?  How did data look when stopping at a stop light or stop sign?  Can we differentiate between my trip there and my trip back?  Another interesting thing I did this quarter was make an Excel spreadsheet to help my mentor decide what two GPS data logging devices he should buy.  I created an Excel sheet with columns “Name,” “Price,” “Weight,” “Capacity,” Protocols,” “Software,” “Duration,” and “Power Supply.”  I filled in the information that I found out about each data logger (with the help of amazon.com and semsons.com).  Once at APL, I met with an employee who asked to look at the Excel sheet, as she wanted to buy a data logging device (this made me feel helpful!).  I met with another woman at APL, who told me about a program that she thought I might be interested in joining: Mars Education Student Data Teams (MESDT) (teams of high school students that are interested in science, engineering, or astronomy).  They aid in collecting data, conducting research, and analyzing data from the CRISM instrument (the spectrometer onboard MRO, a vehicle on Mars).  She gave me different websites and told me how Atholton can be a part of this program.  I am excited to make use of my new skills, my understanding of these tools, and information from my new colleagues as the school year continues.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.